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Heat Capacity

The heat capacity, or the specific heat of a material, is the proportionality constant between the increase in temperature and the increase in heat absorbed by the material per unit mass, per unit temperature.

H = m C (T2 - T1)

where:
H = Heat absorbed by object
m = mass of object
C = heat capacity of material in the object
T1 = starting temperature
T2 = final temperature

The unit used for C should match those used for H, m and T.

For example: If a material has a heat capacity of 5 J g−1 K−1 then increasing the temperature of 1 gram of that material by 1 °C will cause it to absorb 5 J.


Common Heat Capacity Values

Data taken from Wikipdia all Wikipedia licensing conditions apply

SubstancePhasecp J g−1 K−1Cp J mol−1 K−1
Air (Sea level, dry, 0 °C)gas129.07
Air (typical room conditionsA)gas1.0129.19
Aluminiumsolid0.924.2
Ammonialiquid4.780.08
Argongas0.5220.79
Berylliumsolid1.8216.4
Coppersolid0.3924.47
Diamondsolid0.516.115
Ethanolliquid2.44112
Gasolineliquid2.22228
Goldsolid0.1325.42
Graphitesolid0.718.53
Heliumgas5.1920.79
Hydrogengas14.328.82
Ironsolid0.4525.1
Lithiumsolid3.5824.8
Mercuryliquid0.1427.98
Nitrogengas1.0429.12
Neongas1.0320.79
Oxygengas0.9229.38
Silica (fused)solid0.742.2
Uraniumsolid0.11627.7
Watergas (100 °C)2.0837.47
Waterliquid (25 °C)4.1875.33
Watersolid (0 °C)2.1138.09
Asphaltsolid0.92
Bricksolid0.84
Concretesolid0.88
Glass, silicasolid0.84
Glass, crownsolid0.67
Glass, flintsolid0.5
Glass, pyrexsolid0.75
Granitesolid0.79
Gypsumsolid1.09
Marble, micasolid0.88
Sandsolid0.84
Soilsolid0.8
Woodsolid0.42
All measurements are at 25 °C unless otherwise noted. Notable minima and maxima are shown in maroon.

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