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Amides

Amides

Background:


Amides result from the combination of amines with carboxylic acids.

The form of the molcule resembles that of an ester with the exception that the central connecting atom is a nitrogen rather than an oxygen.

Physical Properties:


Methanamide is a liquid at room temperature (melting point: 3°C), but all other amides are solid.

The short chain amides are soluble in water whereas solubility decreases with the molecular size. Typically amides are less soluble than comparable amines and carboxylic acids.

Laboratory Preparation:


Amides are commonly formed from the reaction of a carboxylic acid with an amine.

CH3COOH + NH3 --> CH3(C=O)NH2 + H2O

Naming Conventions:


A simple amide is named by writing the alkane name for the carbon chain and replacing the "-e" with "-amide".

CH3CH2(C=O)NH2 - propanamide

Bibliography:


Wikipedia article on amides
Collection of introductory level articles on amide chemistry

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